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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the recalls came from food-borne illness. >> emily schmidt in washington. thank you. >>> tempers in michigan have reached a boiling point. they say it's a power play by the republican-led legislature. michigan governor says he will sign the desk when it hits his desk. cnn's poppy harlow is in michigan with the detail. >> reporter: michigan is the birthplace of the united auto workers, but the future of unions in this state is in question at this hour, the fate over labor unions in michigan is vocal and visual. thousands of protesters stormed the state capitol. the measures were introduced and passed in a single day. rushed through democrats, argue, calling it a subversion of the ledge layive process. >> it terrifies me that they're trying to pass this through so quickly with no discussion from the other side, no understanding of what's important in it. >> the measures would make it illegal for unions and employers to mandate employees join a union or pay any money to the union. i spoke to michigan's republican governor rick schneider. >> i don't view it as anti-union at all. >> they tell me
open between the speaker and the president. president obama took his argument to michigan yesterday, where he also weighed in on a right to work all that's making its way through the state today -- a right to work law. do you support or oppose those laws? michigan will become the 24th state to have one. the phone lines are open. also, send us a tweet or a facebook post, or send us an e- mail. here's what the president said yesterday in michigan. [video clip] >> these right to work law don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they are really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. [cheers and applause] you only have to look to michigan, where workers were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be f
in michigan, democratic caller. go ahead. >> caller: yes. i have a two-part question. i was wondering, for one, i'm going to be retiring here in another 12 years but i'm not going to have social security until probably the age of 70. i'm 50 now. and i was wondering, right now if i was to lose my job for some unforeseen reason, i will lose my benefits. i have the option, as an employee to keep my benefits at a about $800 cost. but when senators and congressman step out of their position, i'm not mistaken, they still have their insurance for life. and then the second part of the question, that i am posing is, i believe they are going to get a 3% pay raise every year and i have never seen in my lifetime them stop that. i was wondering if that is something could be possibly done? >> host: isabel sawhill. >> guest: i assume what you're talking about is that if you were to lose your job you would lose your benefits, you mean primarily your health care benefits. and you're right. you would lose them. under the affordable care act once it is implemented in 2014, that would enable you to go on an excha
front, you can see it around chicago coming through areas of central michigan. that's what will be arriving here tomorrow. some moisture in the form of rain showers. we're in the 40s right now at 44 degrees. by the time we light that tree, national christmas tree lighting, 39 degrees your temperature. not too bad at all out there for the evening. back to you. >> thanks, veronica. >>> today washington state becomes the first to legalize in the nation recreational marijuana. >> the new law doesn't allow people to light up in public, and it doesn't tell police how to enforce the law. nbc's chris clackum has more on how the new law will work. >> three, two, one! >> reporter: when the clock struck midnight in seattle thursday, 100 or so pot lovers gathered beneath the space needle to light up. recreational use of marijuana is now legal in washington state, after voters approved the measure on november 6th. >> washington voters were very ready for a new approach to marijuana. >> reporter: a new approach that led to adults over 21, possess up to an ounce of pot and use it, but onl
, smaller business owners. the 10 to go after people from flint, michigan, not so, in tennessee. by a large we're talking to smaller investors, entrepreneurs, business owners. host: what are the members concerns with the fiscal cliff stocks? -- talks? guest: for most small-business owners and senior executives at big companies, the fear is that going over the cliff, even on a technical term, will increase their borrowing costs and will put our economic recovery at risk. most business leaders point to simpson-bowles. they understand that we have to raise revenue and we also have to control spending. they generally like the outlines of the simpson-bowles deal, the principles behind it. spread the cost, protect the most vulnerable, don't disrupt the economic recovery, try to simplify the tax code. they generally support those principles. host: do they believe a recession could happen if we fall off the so called "fiscal cliff?" guest: they do. what we saw last year is business leaders were concerned that washington was not going to come together with a deal. and that it could end badly, but it
states are implementing these conservative ideas. we see states like michigan join us. we do not force people to join unions and economies move and want to be a part of what is happening. when you get more parents choices of education, it tells all children, low-income children, we see it all over the country. we can prove it with research prepare. when states have the right for their own energy, the revenues that come into the government help build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that is an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. this could be more efficient and do much better than we can do under the federal area. the principles of freedom are working. we need to spot like them, a showcase them, communicate them so people see that these ideas work. at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington and see that the ideas that emplace are dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, the friends of freedom in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready not with political ideas of american ideas, ideas we now are working th
was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in his own politics. national defense, he was a staunch anti-communist. he played an important role in right wing anti-communist populist politics in the late '50s and early 1960s. it's one of the thing
oversight. host: in michigan, lawrence is a democrat prepared -- a democrat. caller: as far as all the security and coverage that we have for mental health issues, will there be any more money coming from homeland security for mental health issues? we need better coverage. host: lawrence, before we let you go, do you have any sense how your local community uses, and security grant? what michigan does with the money gets from the federal government? caller: i do know we have politicians the do their best. what exactly do, i'm not sure. guest: the issue of mental health is certainly a major one facing the u.s. ran out and what happened with the tragic incidents as last week underscored the need some for mental health. -- the need for mental health. health and human services, hhs, has units that help state allen local communities address their mental health issues. host: do citizens generally have an idea what their states are using the homeland security grants for? is it on the website or their clearing houses? guest: we issued a report earlier this year that looked specifically at t
. host: ? writes -- josh rogin writes -- brian is with us from michigan. republican line. caller: good morning. one of the questions i have had since the beginning is where was the president and secretary of state? did they see this going down in real time? i have not heard that question asked. i hope you can answer both questions. why did these recent three or four leave the state department? what did they do wrong to leave? will they be subpoenaed, will they be asked to come and testify? guest: as for real-time surveillance, what we know now is that there was some surveillance of the attack. apparently there was an unarmed drone that was quickly deploy that captured some of the attack. we also learned that there was testimony that the deputy assistant secretary who was in charge of the embassy security was monitoring these events in real time along with a couple of other people. we are not sure whether the cia and defense department were monitoring, but it is possible they were. president obama had a full schedule. he was in the middle of the campaign that day. he was being briefed b
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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